Where to Put Your Moth Traps

By Julie Miller
Where to Put Your Moth Traps

When your home is suffering from a moth issue, you immediately want to know how to handle the problem, as you may have already lost a pantry full of food or your favorite winter coat. First, you must rid your home of the source of infestation. Second, you must prevent their return. 

Where Do They Live?

Unlike the moths you find fluttering around light bulbs on your porch, these moths prefer quiet corners of living spaces of your home, particularly your dark closet and your stocked pantry. 

What Attracts Moths?

The moths that live in closets are called clothing moths. However, it is not actually the moth that feeds. It is another part of the moth’s life cycle—its larvae. Moths lay their eggs, tucked away in clothing in the back of your closet. Once the eggs hatch, the newborn larvae begin to eat. They love to consume different types of fabrics like wool, cotton, silk, and other linens.

Moths that live in kitchen cupboards are called pantry moths. They will only reside in the cupboards where food is accessible. Much like the clothing moth, the adult moth will lay her egg within the material where they will feed when hatched. Instead of your fur coat, this time, it will be a bag of flour, boxes of cereal, bags of rice or beans, and any other dried good you may have stored; this includes pet food. While pantry moths are not likely to eat your clothes, they can still wreak havoc in your home.

What Do I Do if I Have Moths?

Once you have spotted your first moth it is a good idea to put out a moth trap. The type of moth trap you purchase will depend on where you find the moth. There are traps designed for both areas of the home, and Dr. Killigan’s offers them as part of their premium line of product for your home. Premium Clothing Moth Traps and Premium Pantry Moth Traps are both pheromone traps that attract adult moths and trap them for easy disposal. They are 100% safe, toxin-free, and are simple to use. They also do not require a separate wafer, like many other traps on the market. The pheromone is mixed into the glue on the trap. 

Where Is the Best Place to Put My Trap?

The best place to install your traps is where you have found the moths are most active. This is where Dr. Killigan’s best has your back. Our Premium Pantry Moth Traps and Premium Clothing Moth Traps are respectively designed for your pantry and closet, where they are highly effective in your battle against bugs.

One of the greatest things about Dr. Killigan’s products is that we go the extra mile for our customers. We take the time to think about what you think about, "how will this product look in my home?" We all desire a world without bugs, but they do happen. We may need to now and then take measures of using devices to dispose of them, and we don’t want visitors to see the devices we are using. So, at Dr. Killigan’s, we not only do our best to uphold our motto of Killing them Softly®, we aim to do it with efficiency and style.


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2 comments
  • Hello Andrew,
    Thank you for reaching out to us. I’m so sorry to hear you are having clothing moth issues. We are here to help you achieve victory over your moth battle. It sounds like you are on the right track with all of the hard work you are doing to eliminate the source.

    In terms of placement, we recommend placing one Clothing Moth Trap on your clothing rod and one low to the ground in your closet. A drawing of this placement can be found in the insert included with your product. Clothing moths are not strong fliers, so having one near the ground can be a helpful location. Placing a third trap on the other side of the room around 8-10 feet away can also help draw away moths from the closet. The pheromone attractant can permeate up to 100 ft. if there is constant airflow, which will help draw out any moths that are in the vicinity.

    It is normal to see a few moths around the house. I recommend starting with the traps in the closet first and keeping an eye out for any moths in other areas of the house. If you start to see more moths in another room, place a few traps in the area.

    Please reach out to our Customer Service Team if you have any other questions or concerns.

    Cheers!

    Vanessa and the Dr. Killigan’s Team

    Vanessa on
  • I see one closet as the main congregation of clothes moths, but see an occasional moth at other sites in the house, e.g. a bathroom and drowned in the toilet. Do I need to spread the six traps around or just place one first in the closet and see what happens? I ran the wool coats in the dryer for 45 mins to heat kill any eggs. Do I need to dry clean everything?
    Thanks,
    Andy

    Andrew Melcer on

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